Resources

rss

Dialogic Approaches to Global Challenges: Moving from “Dialogue Fatigue” to Dialogic Change Processes

Authors: Pruitt, B. & Waddell, S.
Publication date: 2005

This working paper of the Generative Dialogue Project looks at dialogic change processes, which involve people coming together seeking to make positive change through conversation and agreement as an answer to the challenges of globalization.

It zooms in on the case of climate change, followed by an analysis of global change initiatives. It concludes that this new model of organizing will not supplant the existing international system but it is an essential complement to it.

Agency and Citizenship in a Context of Gender-Based Violence

Authors: Shahrokh, T. & Wheeler, J.
Publication date: 2014 (IDS Evidence Report no 73)

This pilot evaluation explores how citizenship and agency among social activists can be fostered in contexts of urban violence at the local level. The focus of this pilot is to understand how a sense of democratic citizenship and the ability to act on that citizenship at the local level can contribute to reducing different types of urban violence and promote security; and how becoming an activist against violence can contribute to constructing a sense of citizenship.

Shifting the way we co-create. How we can turn the challenges of sustainability into opportunities.

Authors: Kuenkel, P. & Schaefer, K (for The Collective Leadership Institute)
Publication date: 2013

In May 2012, the Collective Leadership Institute started a research project to explore the factors and patterns that help engender a collective way of leading for sustainability. The insights gained from this study show that isolated action needs to be replaced by collective leadership – a paradigm shift in how individuals find their leadership roles in the spirit of co-creation and contribution to the common good.

Successful Organizational Learning in the Management of Agricultural Research and Innovation: The Mexican Produce Foundations

Authors: Ekboir, J.M. et alii. (IFPRI research report 162)
Publication date: 2009

Using a theoretical framework that draws on the literature on innovation systems, complexity theories, and organizational cultures and governance, this study analyzes the factors that allowed the Mexican Produce Foundations to develop strong innovative capabilities and how these capabilities were affected by changes in the interactions among regulatory frameworks, the federal and state governments and organizational structures, creative individuals, and the history of the processes.