Resources

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Bridging and Bonding: Improving the Links Between Transparency and Accountability Actors

Authors: Wanjiku Kelbert, A.
Publication date: 2014

The first Learning and Inspiration Event hosted by Making All Voices Count brought together people with different kinds of expertise to think collaboratively about how technology can be used to enhance citizen engagement and improve government responsiveness. 

“Why don’t they want our help?” Exploring the relationship between community and development worker

In this IDS blog post, Jody Aked reflects upon the misplaced assumption that communities are always receptive and eager to engage when development practitioners or researchers offer something they think the community will benefit from. To avoid a frustrating outcome, she suggests an alternative approach, including three ways on how to start a positive relationship with a community. 

Reading the Local Context: A Causal Chain Approach to Social Accountability

Author: Joshi, A.
Publication date: 2014 (Pre-submitted version of article for IDS Bulletin 45.5)

This paper focuses on the question of ‘context’ in social accountability initiatives by separating macro and micro contextual factors. The paper outlines the basic components of accountability and proposes a ‘causal chain’ strategy to better understand the micro-context.

Six Key Findings on the Use of Theories of Change in International Development

Author: Valters, C.
Publication date: 2014

The Theory of Change approach is becoming a pervasive part of development practice: as an artefact, as a management tool, and increasingly as a common discourse which implementers use to explain and explore their interventions. In this blog post, Craig Valters introduces the 6 key findings of his research and paper: ‘Theories of Change in international development: communication, learning or accountability?’ 

Community Toolbox: Developing a Framework or Model of Change

This toolkit helps in developing a picture of the pathway from activities to intended outcomes. It provides step by step guidance to develop a Logic Model or Theory of Change. A separate section presents 11 examples. 

Keystone Theory of Change Template

Author: Keystone
Publication date: 2008

The template should be used together with the IPAL Keystone guide: "Developing a Theory of Change". This tool explains the concepts behind the development of a theory of change for complex change processes.

IPAL: Developing a theory of change. A guide to developing a theory of change as a framework for inclusive dialogue, learning and accountability for social impact.

Author: IPAL - Keystone
Publication date: 2009

This guide helps social purpose organizations to plan, monitor, evaluate and communicate their work in a way that makes practical sense of the complexity of social change processes and their measurement.

Guidance Note 3: Theory of Change approach to climate change adaptation programming

Authors: Bours, D., McGinn, C. & Pringle, P. (for SEA Change CoP, UKCIP)
Publication date: 2014

This Guidance Note describes the Theory of Change approach and explains why it is a good fit for climate change adaptation programming. It highlights its differences with the more familiar logic model / logical framework (‘logframe’) approaches – and also shows how they can be used together.

Using Theory of Change and Theories of Action for International Advocacy Networks by Innovations for Scaling Impact

Innovations for Scaling Impact (iScale) and the Center for Evaluation Innovation present a series of original webinars that explores evaluation approaches and tools that contribute to the improved effectiveness of international advocacy efforts. The following webinar focuses on the use of a Theory of Change and Theories of Action.