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Sociale innovatie: meerwaarde in krachtig samenspel

Authors: Everts, P. et alii.
Publication date: 2014 (in Sigma online) 

  • De aandacht voor sociale inovatie is de afgelopen tien jaar wereldwijd toegenomen.
  • Nu de economie weer aantrekt lijkt de aandacht weer af te nemen en dat is onwenselijk.
  • Om sociale innovatie een impuls te geven is meer samenwerking nodig, een bundeling van krachten, creativiteit, eigenaarschap van vraagstukken, technologie en leiderschap. 

From best practice to best fit: understanding and navigating wicked problems in international development

Authors: Ramalingam, B., Laric,M. & Primrose, J.
Publication date: 2014

This Working Paper summarises the findings of a series of small-scale pilots of selected complex systems methods in DFID’s wealth creation work. The pilots contributed to improved analysis and understanding of a range of wicked problems, and generated tangible findings that were directly utilised in corporate and programmatic decisions. 

Women’s participation in green growth – a potential fully realised?

Author: von Hagen, M. & Willems, J.
Publication date: 2012

This study analyses opportunities and challenges for women’s participation in green growth in developing countries. The purpose of the study is threefold: 

  • to shed more light on the gender dimension of green growth, especially in the context of private sector development and thus fill a knowledge gap in the green growth discourse
  • to validate women’s contributions to green growth and sustainable private sector development
  • to promote women’s empowerment and gender equality

Capacity, complexity and consulting: lessons from managing capacity development projects

Author: Datta, A., Shaxson, L. & Pellini, A.
Publication date: 2012

In the past few years, the ODI’s Research and Policy in Development Programme has increasingly collaborated with or managed large multiyear projects where it has been responsible for helping local institutions and organisations to build their capacity to use knowledge to improve policies and practices.

Setting aside the issue of knowledge-to-policy links, this paper serves to 1) reflect on what capacity is and how it develops; 2) identify implications of this for approaches used to promote capacity improvement processes; and 3) assess what this means for funding
practices.

Government Responsiveness: a think-piece for the Making All Voices Count programme

Author: McGee, R.
Publication date: 2014

When citizens exercise voice, what is it that makes their voices count, or not count? If citizens’ voices count, governments are being responsive. This think-piece zooms in on the research question: "What makes government actors targeted by tech-enabled transparency and accountability initiatives change their behaviour and act responsively?" It investigates what kinds of citizen engagement lead to what kinds of government responsiveness, and what turns government actors into Transparency and Accountability champions. 

Fostering new ideas for social inclusion and accountable responsive governance: a think-piece for the Making All Voices Count programme

Authors: Edwards, D.
Publication date: 2014

The Making All Voices Count programme aims to foster and support new ideas to improve governance and achieve greater social justice. This think-piece examines how programmes such as Making All Voices Count might utilise innovation as a strategy for addressing complex governance problems. 

A local vision of climate adaptation: Participatory urban planning in Mozambique

Authors: Broto, V.C., Boyd, E., Ensor, J. & Allen, C.
Publication date: 2014

This article shares the findings of the project "Public Private People Partnerships for Climate Compatible Development (4PCCD)". It was a small project (£114,000) that ran from 2011 to 2013 in Maputo, Mozambique. It investigated whether local views be represented fairly in national and municipal planning processes through a partnership approach.

By experimenting with different forms of participatory planning, 4PCCD aimed to identify local priorities for climate-related action, along with the key actors and resources needed to make it happen.

Responsibility to protect (RtoP): Training toolkit for civil society actors and multidimensional peace support personnel in West Africa

Author: Martyns Okeke, J., Ekiyor, T. & Balogun, O. (for the West Africa Civil Society Institute)
Publication date: 2013

This toolkit on the Responsibility to Protect (RtoP) was designed to introduce the concept to practitioners and policy makers in West Africa, as well as deepen their knowledge of its development and practice. It aims to achieve this through seven targeted training sessions to be delivered over three days using a combined methodology of brainstorming, mini-lectures and quizzes, open discussions, group work and case study exercises. 

8 Differences Between Traditional and Collaborative Leaders

The modern workplace is changing. As businesses seek innovative solutions to a challenging economic environment, companies are trying different approaches to increase productivity, engage workers and encourage growth. The traditional leadership style of top down management is slowly evolving into a collaborative approach that empowers employees and blurs the lines between boss and worker. 

This Innocentive blog post presents the main differences between traditional and collaborative leaders. 

Community Toolbox: Building Leadership Toolkit

This online toolkit helps in developing a plan for enhancing leadership and its core tasks. It sheds a light on building strong adaptive personal and group leadership. It illustrates among others how to assess leadership and provides tools and methods to build leadership and make it work within and across changing groups. A separate section includes 6 examples.